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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)
of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
in u.s. treasuries. >> tom: we ask pimco's bill gross why he's bailing out of government debt and where he's putting money now. you're watching "nightly business" report for wednesday, march 9. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds, corporate debt, foreign bonds and municipal securities. >> susie: so what's the reason behind the bond fire sale? joining us now: william gross, the founder and co-chief investment officer of pimco. hi, bill,
. >> tell us a little about supplies. what is day to day life like in terms of food and water and electricity, and just getting around town? >> the situation in northeastern japan is quite desperate. although, my son, who has just come back to us from sendai, closer in to the city, told us infrastructure is starting to be restored. you walk into tokyo, and there are no neon lights, and there much fewer people walking around the town. it is a bizarre, unsettling atmosphere. >> are people in an orderly fashion, or are they panicky? >> i would say in a lot of senses, this is japanese population's finest hour. in tokyo, as i mentioned earlier, there is a great frustration and anxiety level, but there are also a lot of people saying, you know, we have to pull ourselves together. >> you can hear my complete conversation with lucy, including more on her son's ordeal, on our website, nbron meanwhile, concerns about those damaged nuclear reactors in japan spooked investor confidence, and stock markets around the world sold off. here in the u.s., the panic- selling swept through wall st
around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of the area were urged to evacuate. >> susie: and tom, those warnings spooked u.s. stock investors, sendin
captioning sponsored by wpbt . >> disasters like this remind us of the common humanity we share. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states
in the u.s., the financial markets ignored those debt concerns. but erika miller looks at why american investors may want to pay attention to the crisis in portugal. >> reporter: for the past few weeks, investors have had plenty of distractions, ranging from political upheaval in egypt and libya to natural disasters and nuclear problems in japan to sharply higher oil prices. but today, the spotlight was on a problem many thought had gone away-- the european debt crisis. the fall of the portuguese government has pushed that country's borrowing rates to record levels, making it more difficult for portugal to get a handle on it's debt. economist brian levitt says the fear in financial markets is that portugal could need an expensive bailout. >> the big fear about the fall of the government in portugal is that they are not going to go through the austerity measures that they need, that the larger euro-economies want for them to go through in order to get additional credit facilities. >> reporter: another fear is contagion, reinforced by credit rating agency moody's downgrade of more than 3
earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minutes after the earthquake hit. >> tom: we spoke with our correspondent in tokyo. and began by asking lucy craft what's the initial assessment of damage to businesses and industry in japan. >> companies hit quite hard. sony, hond on, toyota, the major auto makers have a lot of factories up in northeastern japan. there's been a range of damage to these companies. so those factories will be kind of knocked out of operation for various amounts of time. fortunately, the northeastern area of japan is very sparsely populated. this is -- if you compare this to the kobe earthquake of 16 years ago, it accounts for a much smaller amount of gdp. >> reporter: what have you learned about the damage to the trainl systems and infrastructure? >> we haven't heard about the damage to the train system which is a major source of transportation here. when you talk about energy, though, it's a whole different ball of wax, and there's a lot of different
by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and will begin talking with opposition groups. that came after a vote at the united nations calling for a no- fly zone over the country. not surprisingly, oil markets were volatile today. crude prices closed down 35 cents to settle at $101 a barrel, off their high of $103. as suzanne pratt reports the oil market is coping with a long list of issues. >> reporter: in the past week much of the world has been fixated on japan, with one exception. the global oil market is paying much more attention to bubbling co
as global tensions heat up. >> it definitely gives us a moment to pause and reflect and actually take stock of where value really is in the capital markets. >> stock prices dropping 2% today is just an opportunity to pick them up a little cheaper. >> susie: we talk challenges and opportunities in stocks with a market bull and a market bear. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, march 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. investors haven't seen a sell- off in stocks like today's since last summer. several worries were pressuring the markets today, violence in saudi arabia and renewed concerns about europe among them, susie. >> susie: tom, adding to the jitters-- worries about china's economic growth, and some disappointing news about the u.s. job market. the selling was broad-based-- the dow fell 228 points, closing below the 12,000 level; the n
: federal prosecutors allege rajaratnam used inside information to trade 35 stocks. the feds plan to use 173 wiretapped conversations and testimony from confidential informants against rajaratnam. on the list of the government's potential witnesses is lloyd blankfein, the c.e.o. of goldman sachs. rajaratnam's net worth is estimated at $1.5 billion, and he has spent an estimated $20 million on his defense, so far. his lawyers are expected to argue rajaratnam was simply doing thorough research in his role as a hedge fund manager. the trial is likely to last six to eight weeks. it is the government's highest profile attempt to crackdown on illegal trading on wall street. here's how u.s. attorney preet bharara put it when charges were announced at the end of 2009. >> it would be a mistake to think that this investigation is focused only, or even principally on, hedge funds. we have gone far beyond that. in fact, this investigation goes to the very heart of fair play in the business world. >> susie: joining us now with more analysis, steven feldman. he's a former u.s. attorney who worked in new y
viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. on wall street today, there was plenty of talk about berkshire hathaway and david sokol. >> suzanne: he's the executive who unexpectedly resigned from berkshire late yesterday amid surprising revelations about his personal stock trading. sokol was also considered a likely successor to berkshire c.e.o. warren buffett. >> tom: berkshire and sokol insist he did nothing illegal, but does even the suggestion of impropriety taint warren buffett and berkshire? erika miller reports. >> reporter: there's court, and then there's the court of public opinion. both matter in determining whether david sokol did something wrong. law professor jack coffee says criminal charges are highly unlikely. >> i think he may have done something that was morally wrong, reckless, even self- destructive. but i don't think he has violated the insider trading obligation, because he wasn't an insider of the company he was investing in. >> report
and relatively modest increase in u.s. consumer price inflation. >> susie: the latest on inflation and what it'll take to end the fed's government bond buying binge. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 1. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. ben bernanke said today the federal reserve is ready to take action if high oil prices threaten the economy. susie, the fed chief's comments came on a day when oil prices gushed higher. >> susie: tom, as bernanke was testifying on capitol hill in washington, oil futures trading here in new york surged to just below the $100 level. april crude rose $2.66 a barrel, or more than 2.5%. and those rising oil prices triggered a stock sell-off on wall street-- the dow fell 168 points, the nasdaq lost 44, and the s&p 500 off almost 22. >> tom: against that market backdrop, bernanke explain
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)